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Streets and Streetscape

 

EL SEGUNDO DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN

IX. Implementation and Financing

  1. Streets and Streetscape

    Modification and improvement of the existing streets and streetscape, particularly in the Main Street District, will greatly enhance the pedestrian environment in the Downtown. As the pedestrian atmosphere is enhanced, people tend to linger, stroll, and enjoy the area more, spending more time and dollars in the Downtown. The following identifies improvements suggested for the Downtown as specified within Section VIII, Design Standards of this document. The cost estimates provided are very preliminary, as none of the design work has begun.

    1. Sidewalk widening/street narrowing- (300-400 Blocks Main Street)

      Currently the sidewalks in the Main Street District are 12 feet in width, with 4-foot tree wells adjacent to the curb, leaving only 8 feet of sidewalk width in areas where there are trees. There are 7 foot wide parallel parking stalls and two 10-foot 6-inch driving lanes on each side of the street. The total right-of-way width is 80 feet, with a 56 feet of curb to curb width. This current configuration leaves little room for outdoor retail activities such as outdoor dining, art displays, and sidewalk sales, or for pedestrians to stroll and enjoy the Downtown. Additionally, the excess street width tends to speed vehicles through the area instead of slowing them down and protecting the pedestrian environment. As these two blocks are the core of the Downtown, they are seen as the most critical in creating the desired pedestrian-oriented environment.

      The proposed three-lane street configuration would widen the sidewalks to approximately 16.5 feet on each side. The existing parallel parking on each side of the street would be retained and two through driving lanes, one in each direction would be provided. Additionally, a center left-turn lane is key in order to avoid traffic congestion in the Downtown.

      As an alternative, a two-lane configuration with angled parking on the west side and parallel parking on the east side, is proposed. Left-turn pockets, at the intersections only, could be provided due to the constraints of the right-of-way width. The sidewalks could be widened approximately 1.5 feet to 13.5 feet in width. In addition to the sidewalk widening, new colored stamped concrete decorative sidewalks and mid-block crosswalks or colored textured pavement accents are proposed. Approximately 8-10 on-street parking spaces would be lost with the three-lane configuration due to the dedicated right-turn only lanes at street intersections. Several more on-street parking spaces would be lost with the two-lane configuration.

      Narrowing the street would also require reconstruction of the roadway, relocation of streetlights and fire hydrants, the relocation of traffic signals and loop detectors at the Grand and Holly Avenue intersections, and the installation of infrastructure (conduit) to accommodate future installation of modern high speed "bandwidth" and fiber optic cables. These modifications are seen as a permanent, Phase II approach, to creating a truly pedestrian-oriented environment in the core of the Downtown. A Phase I, short-term improvement plan for the 100-500 blocks of Main Street is discussed below.

      Estimated Cost: $776,000

      Potential Funding Sources: General Fund ($160,000 previously approved in 1999/2000 CIP budget, additional funding of $320,000 could be reallocated from Civic Center Plaza budget- see discussion under Section C. of Implementation), Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval), BID, and/or other assessment district.
    2. Street Modifications- (100-500 Blocks Main Street) As a Phase I approach, the existing roadway from El Segundo Boulevard to Mariposa Avenue, or just the portion from Grand to Pine Avenues, with the existing 56 foot curb to curb width, could be re-striped. The re-striping could accommodate the same roadway configuration, as the Phase II permanent approach discussed above, but without the sidewalk widening and with slightly different lane widths. The street would be slurry sealed and re-striped to provide a clean look. A portion of these improvements have already been budgeted by the Public Works Department as part of a Citywide slurry seal project scheduled to begin in September, 2000, with the exception of the traffic signal loop detectors, the sandblasting and the design costs for the new three-lane configuration. The re-striping would maintain the existing 56-foot curb to curb width and 12 foot sidewalk widths, as a temporary measure to analyze traffic and pedestrian movements. It is anticipated that the re-striping will help to slow vehicular traffic, without causing congestion, while creating a safer environment for pedestrians. The three-lane configuration re-striping would provide one through-lane in each direction, a center left-turn lane, and parallel parking on both sides of the street. As an alternative, a two-lane configuration with angled parking on the west side and parallel parking on the east side, is proposed. Left-turn pockets, at the intersections only, could be provided due to the constraints of the right-of-way width. Approximately 8-10 on-street parking spaces would be lost with the three-lane configuration due to the dedicated right-turn only lanes at the intersections. Several more on-street parking spaces would be lost with the two-lane configuration. A bike lane could be accommodated in the 100-200 blocks of Main Street connecting to the bike route on Grand Avenue. Estimated cost: $22,765 if completed with the current budgeted CIP project. $44,265 if project is separated from the current CIP project scheduled to begin in September, 2000.

      Funding Source: Gas Tax (previously approved in 1999/2000 CIP budget)

    3. Street Modifications- (100-300 Blocks Richmond Street) The only modification proposed for Richmond Street is the installation of infrastructure (conduit) to accommodate future installation of modern high speed "bandwidth" and fiber optic cables. Pacific Bell currently has fiber optic facilities in El Segundo Boulevard west to Whiting Street. The conduit on Richmond Street could tie in with these facilities or another provider if their facilities are located in proximity in the future. The conduit would provide expanded opportunities and encourage high tech offices and live/work uses.

      Estimated Cost: $184,200

      Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval) BID, and/or other assessment district.
    4. Street Modifications- (100-200 Blocks West Grand Avenue) Currently Grand Avenue has a right-of-way width of 100 feet with 10-foot sidewalks on both sides, two driving lanes on each side and parallel parking on both curb lanes. The center island is 18 feet in width with a 4-foot median as well as 7-foot wide parallel parking on both sides of the median. This right-of-way width is the largest in the City west of Sepulveda Boulevard, as it originally accommodated the red car rail lines. The existing center street parking is awkward and not pedestrian friendly. The proposed modifications would maintain the existing 10-foot wide sidewalks, or potentially widen them to as much as 15 feet, and remove the central island and parking. The existing parallel parking adjacent to the curb would be removed and replaced with angled parking to partially make up for the removed center parking. It is anticipated that the number of parking spaces would be approximately the same as currently exist. Eliminating the center island parking and creating more parking immediately adjacent to the curb will help facilitate safe and convenient pedestrian access. Four driving lanes, two in each direction could then be accommodated. The proposal would entail removing the existing center island, replacing the island with street pavement, relocation of street lights, slurry sealing and re-striping the entire street. Widening the sidewalks to as much as 15 feet and/ or installing a center landscaped median would increase the cost estimate.

      Estimated Cost: $80,000

      Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval), BID, and/or other assessment district.
    5. Streetscape improvements- (All Districts) Currently there is a lack of pedestrian amenities in the Downtown. Additionally, the streetscape improvements that are provided have no continuity or consistency. The proposed improvements would provide high quality and consistent pedestrian amenities.
      1. 300-400 Blocks Main Street-(600 and 450 feet in length, each block)
        • Decorative street lights-10 and 8 per block (5 and 4 each side) 18 total- $5000 each
          $90,000
        • Benches-12 and 10 per block (6 and 5 each side) 22 total- $500 each
          $11,000
        • Trash receptacles, including accommodations for recyclable materials-12 and 10 per block (6 and 5 each side) 22 total- $500 each
          $11,000
        • Bike racks-6 and 4 per block (3 and 2 each side) 10 total- $500 each
          $5000

          Estimated Cost: $117,000

      2. 100-300 Blocks Richmond Street-(500, 335, and 600 feet in length, each block)
        • Decorative street lights-8, 6 and 10 per block (4,3, and 5 each side) 24 total- $5000 each
          $120,000
        • Benches-10, 8 and 12 per block (5, 4 and 6 each side) 30 total- $500 each
          $15,000
        • Trash receptacles including accommodations for recyclable materials-10, 8 and 12 per block (5, 4 and 6 each side) 30 total- $500 each
          $15,000
        • Bike racks-4, 4 and 6 per block (2, 2 and 3 each side) 14 total- $500 each

          $7000

          Estimated Cost: $157,000

      3. 100, 200 and 500 Blocks Main Street-(500, 335, and 450 feet in length, each block) No streetscape improvements are proposed in these blocks at this time, as they are transitional in nature. Future improvements are recommended to include the same type of amenities as detailed above, and costs would be comparable.
      4. 100 and 200 Blocks West Grand Avenue-(300 feet in length, each block)
        • Decorative street lights- 6 per block (3 each side) 12 total- $5000 each
          $60,000
        • Benches- 8 per block (4 each side) 16 total- $500 each
          $8,000
        • Trash receptacles including accommodations for recyclable materials- 8 per block (4 each side) 16 total- $500 each
          $8,000
        • Bikeracks-4 per block (2 each side) 8 total- $500 each
          $4000

          Estimated Cost: $80,000

          Total Estimated Cost: $354,000

          Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval), BID, and/or other assessment district.
      5. Street Trees-(All Districts) Currently all of the streets in the Downtown are planted with Ficus trees. These trees were planted approximately 30 to 50 years ago and stand approximately 25 to 30 feet in height with trunks that are 1-3 feet in diameter. These street trees are located in 3 to 4 foot square tree wells, generally immediately adjacent to the curb. Trees are currently planted approximately 40 feet on-center. In the past, the trees were pruned very heavily, maintaining their height to approximately 10-15 feet with a very small, dense canopy. Over the past several years the trees have been allowed to grow up and out and pruning has been limited to removing lower branches to raise the canopy and thinning the branches. The Ficus tree is a rainforest tree that naturally has many large surface roots. As the canopy of the trees has been allowed to grow, the trunk diameter of the trees, as well as the surface roots, have grown, making the trees too large for the space that they are confined to. Additionally, some of the merchants in the Downtown have expressed concern that the large very dense trees are blocking signage and building architecture. Due to all of these factors, and the fact that the street is proposed to be reconfigured in the 300 and 400 block of Main Street, it is recommended that the existing Ficus street trees be removed and replaced with more appropriate street trees. There will potentially be a tremendous visual impact when these mature trees are removed and, in order to minimize this impact, trees in the Downtown should be removed in phases and replaced with mature box size trees. In some areas, removal and replacement may occur at a later date. Additionally, "structured soil" is recommended to be used to protect the health of the new trees and the new infrastructure. Structured soil is a well drained and aerated mixture of egg-sized granite quarry stone, clay loam soil, and hydrogel, a horticultural material that helps the soil adhere to the quarry stone. This unique soil structure composition enables optimum tree root and water penetration, allowing crucial oxygen, and nutrient delivery to the trees and optimal drainage. Structured soil has been specifically developed, tested, and designed for trees planted in sidewalks and areas with limited soil. Structured soil has been shown to decrease surface roots which cause the extensive damage described above. Trees are healthier, grow faster, stronger, and live longer with the ideal growing environment. Additionally, larger and faster growing tree species can be selected as street trees when structured soil is used, which enhances the aesthetics of the streetscape more quickly and gives more options for the types of trees that can be used. A larger area than is typical must be excavated (approximately 10 feet wide by 2 feet deep for the entire block) to accommodate the structured soil. An irrigation system would also be recommended to ensure that the new street trees, as well as other landscaped areas, receive regular and adequate water which is particularly important during the first few years when the landscaping is becoming established. Reclaimed water could be utilized, as there is an existing reclaimed water main in the 300-500 blocks of Eucalyptus Drive and in Mariposa Avenue between Eucalyptus Drive and Virginia Street. Reclaimed water has been used successfully in both Library and Recreation Parks, and all nursery grown plant material is required to be irrigated with reclaimed water so the new plant material would be accustomed to reclaimed water. Decorative tree grates are also recommended to protect the trees and provide an attractive environment.
        1. 300-400 Blocks Main Street-(600 and 450 feet in length, each block)
          • Removal and replacement of existing street trees at an average of 30 feet on-center with 48- inch box trees with decorative metal tree grates- 40 and 30 per block (20 and 15 each side) 70 total-$2,100 each
            $147,000
          • Excavation and disposal of existing soil, and installation and compaction of structured soil. 10 foot wide by 2 foot deep strip, entire length of block (889 cy+667 cy = 1556 cy) - $70 per cubic yard.
            $108,897
          • Irrigation including main, remote control valves, sprinkler heads, and lateral connections on both sides of the block-$60 per foot- (2100 feet total)
            $126,000
          • Water main connection with backflow device and irrigation controller with electrical service-$7000 each- 1 per block (2 blocks)
            $14,000

            Estimated Cost: $395,897

        2. 100-300 Blocks Richmond Street-(500, 335, and 600 feet in length, each block)
          • Removal and replacement of existing street trees at an average of 30 feet on-center with 48- inch box trees with decorative metal tree grates- 34, 22 and 40 per block (17, 11 and 20 each side) 96 total-$2,100 each. 36-inch box trees- $1,400 each. 24-inch box $850 each.
            $81,600-(24-inch box)
            $134,400-(36-inch box)
            $201,600-(48-inch box)
          • Excavation and disposal of existing soil, and installation and compaction of structured soil. 10 foot wide by 2 foot deep strip, entire length of block- $70 per cubic yard (740 cy+496 cy+889 cy = 2125 cy)
            $148,750
          • Irrigation including main, remote control valves, sprinkler heads, and lateral connections on both sides of the block-$60 per foot- (2,870 feet total)
            $172,200
          • Water main connection with backflow device and irrigation controller with electrical service-$7,000 each- 1 per block (3 blocks)
            $21,000

            Estimated Cost:

            $423,550-(24-inch box trees)
            $476,350-(36-inch box trees)
            $543,550-(48-inch box trees)
        3. 100, 200 and 500 Blocks Main Street-(500, 335, and 450 feet in length, each block)
          • Removal and replacement of existing street trees at an average of 40 feet on-center with 48- inch box trees with decorative metal tree grates- 26, 16 and 22 per block (13, 8 and 11 each side) 64 total-$2,100 each. 36-inch box trees- $1,400 each. 24-inch box $850 each.
            $54,400-(24-inch box)
            $89,600-(36-inch box)
            $134,400-(48-inch box)
          • Excavation and disposal of existing soil and installation and compaction of structured soil 10 foot wide by 2 foot deep strip, entire length of block- $70 per cubic yard (740 cy+496 cy+667 cy = 1903 cy).
            $133,210
          • Irrigation including main, remote control valves, sprinkler heads, and lateral connections on both sides of the block-$60 per foot- (2570 feet total)
            $154,200
          • Water main connection with backflow device and irrigation controller with electrical service-$7000 each- 1 per block (3 blocks)
            $21,000

            Estimated Cost:

            $362,810-(24-inch box trees)
            $398,010-(36-inch box trees)
            $442,810-(48-inch box trees)
        4. 100 and 200 Blocks West Grand Avenue-(300 feet in length, each block)
          • Removal and replacement of existing street trees at an average of 30 feet on-center with 48- inch box trees with decorative metal tree grates- 20 per block (10 each side) 40 total-$2,100 each. 36-inch box trees- $1,400 each. 24-inch box $850 each.
            $34,000-(24-inch box)
            $56,000-(36-inch box)
            $84,000-(48-inch box)
          • Excavation and disposal of existing soil, and installation and compaction of structured soil. 10 foot wide by 2 foot deep strip, entire length of block (888 cy) $70 per cubic yard
            $62,160
          • Irrigation including main, remote control valves, sprinkler heads, and lateral connections on both sides of the block-$60 per foot- (1,200 feet total)
            $72,000
          • Water main connection with backflow device and irrigation controller with electrical service-$7000 each- 1 per block (2 blocks)
            $14,000

            Estimated Cost:

            $182,100-(24-inch box trees)
            $204,100-(36-inch box trees)
            $232,100-(48-inch box trees)

            Total Estimated Cost:

            $1,364,357(24-inch box trees- except 48-inch in Main Street District)
            $1,474,357 (36-inch box trees- except 48-inch in Main Street District)
            $1,614,357 (48-inch box trees)
            Potential Funding Sources: General Fund ($100,000 previously approved in 1999/2000 CIP budget for City-wide Street Tree Master Plan Tree Replacement), Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval) BID, and/or other assessment district. The following photographs and descriptions are examples of the types of open canopy trees that may be appropriate as street trees.

          EXHIBIT 6 STREET TREES

      6. Planters at curb-extensions/mid-block crosswalks - (300 - 400 Blocks Main Street) Curb-extensions into the streets at key intersections and at mid-block crosswalks also add to the pedestrian-friendly atmosphere by creating interesting nodes with landscaping, benches, and other pedestrian amenities where pedestrians can stop briefly and enjoy their Downtown. Extensions create a pedestrian safe zone, advising motorists that the pedestrian takes priority in the area. The extensions narrow the crosswalk length by bringing these amenities out into the street to the end of the on-street parallel parking, thereby not affecting vehicular circulation. These improvements are appropriate in the Main Street District where the street is proposed to be narrowed. The cost for raised planters and/or enhanced landscaping in these areas is detailed in this section. Other pedestrian amenities are included in the costs detailed in Section 3- Streetscape improvements.

        Locations include:

        Main Street and Grand Avenue- 2
        Main Street and Civic Center Plaza- 4 (Optional, Mid-block crosswalks)
        Main Street and Holly Avenue-4
        Main Street and Pine Avenue-2

        $5000 per location-8 to 12 locations

        Estimated Cost: $40,000 to $60,000

        Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval) BID, and/or other assessment district
      7. Gateway landscaping and signage-(Various locations) Gateways mark the passageway into or out of the Downtown. These key entry points should provide tall vertical elements to emphasize their importance and street level landscaping should be rich in color and detail to create vibrant entry focal points. Palm trees and entry signage is proposed in these locations to mark these entryways. Entry signage only is proposed near the intersection of Grand Avenue and Eucalyptus Drive as the existing large mature Ficus trees in the median create an entry statement and they are proposed to remain at this time. Locations include: Main Street and Grand Avenue
        Concord Street and Grand Avenue
        Main Street and Mariposa Avenue
        Grand Avenue and Eucalyptus Drive
        $20,000 per location-3 locations
        $5,000- entry signage only-1 location

        Estimated Cost: $ 65,000

        Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval) BID, and/or other assessment district The following photographs and descriptions are examples of the types of Palm trees that may be appropriate as entry gateway statements.

        EXHIBIT 7 GATEWAY PALMS

      8. "Twinkle" lights- (300 and 400 Blocks of Main Street) "Twinkle" or other seasonal lights have been used very successfully in other downtown’s to create an exciting atmosphere. Permanent lights using underground utilities, electrical outlets and transformer at each tree location, grounded outlets, weatherproof enclosures, GFCI circuits, and automatic on-off switching devices would be necessary to conform to Uniform Code requirements and for safety and durability. The necessary electrical service could be installed at the same time as the street improvements and the new street trees so that there would be minimal disruption. As an option, a cost estimate has been provided for lighting the existing street trees. The electrical outlets could also be used to service the lighting and other electrical needs of the farmers market, and other Downtown events. Additionally, the lights will require on-going maintenance costs including replacement of burned out bulbs, adjustments of the lights as the trees grow, and replacement of other worn parts. Additionally, with the coastal environment it is expected that the strings of lights will need to be totally replaced approximately every 10 years. Existing street trees-40 existing street trees-$3000 to $3700 each tree. Estimated installation cost: $120,000 to $148,000
        Estimated annual maintenance cost: $8720- ($218 per tree)
        New street trees- After removal of existing street trees. Street trees at an average of 30 feet on-center with lights for each tree - 40 and 30 trees per block (20 and 15 each side) 70 total-$3000 to $3700 each tree

        Estimated installation cost: $210,000 to $259,000
        Estimated annual maintenance cost: $15,260- ($218 per tree)

        Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval) BID, and/or other assessment district
      9. Parking structure or lot-(Holly Avenue- 100 east Block, east of Main Street to the alley or southeast corner of Holly Avenue and Standard Street) A two-level parking structure to accommodate approximately 70 parking stalls could potentially be located on Holly Avenue, east of Main Street. The structure could start at Main Street and be located in the Holly Avenue right-of-way and in the landscaped area north of the City Hall building on the City Hall property. The structure could extend east to the alley. Holly Avenue could be closed to street traffic in this area, but vehicular access to Holly Avenue east of the alley and to the alley could remain open. To accommodate 70 stalls, an area of approximately 100 feet by 140 feet would be required, 400 square feet per stall. Due to the constraints of such a small site, the cost for construction of a small structure would be approximately $30,000 to $40,000 per stall. Another option could be to double-deck the existing City surface parking lot at the southeast corner of Holly Avenue and Standard Street. This lot has a significant grade change in that the alley on the east side of the lot is approximately 8 feet lower than the elevation on the west side of the lot abutting Standard Street. Access to an upper level open deck could be gained from Standard Street, while a semi-subterranean level could be accessed from the alley. This surface lot currently has 33 parking spaces. Double-decking would lose spaces in the circulation but gain in the additional level. Approximately 70 total spaces could be accommodated on the existing 100’ by 140’ lot. Again, due to the site constraints, the parking would cost approximately $30,000 to $40,000 per stall. If the portion of Standard Street between the existing surface parking lot and the surface lot on the west side of Standard Street which services City vehicles were closed, additional spaces could be accommodated. The City’s traffic engineer states in the Parking Demand Management section of the Specific Plan that currently there is adequate parking in the Downtown, and the potential construction of a parking structure or lot is seen as a long-term parking solution. A structure or lot would only need to be constructed when there is a demand for additional parking spaces, such as when there is construction of new square footage and/or a change in the mix of land uses in the area which increases the parking demand. If a parking district, BID or other mechanism is established to collect parking fees, a fee "nexus" study would potentially be required (in accordance with AB 1600). In-lieu fees could be collected for the long-term construction of a lot or structure, and as an intermediate level solution, portions of the fees could be used for re-stripping and signage. These intermediate measures would consolidate and create more efficient parking. When there is a need, a lot or structure could then be constructed with the balance of the in-lieu fees. If there is no need for a new lot or structure after a certain time frame then the in-lieu fees would be refunded.

        Total: $2,100,000 to $2,800,000

        Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval), in-lieu fees, BID, Parking District, and/or other assessment district.
      10. One-way street- (Holly Avenue-100 east Block, one-way eastbound and Pine Avenue- 100 east Block, one-way westbound)
    Another option to increase available parking within the Downtown area would be to re-stripe existing two-way streets to one-way. The 100 block of east Holly Avenue is already striped with angled parking spaces on a portion of the south side of the block. The north side of the street is striped with parallel spaces. If the street were re-striped as one-way eastbound from Main to Standard Street approximately 6 extra on-street parking spaces could be accommodated, on the north and south sides of the street. The City’s traffic consultant suggested that one-way streets should be designed as couplets to improve traffic flow. A couplet would involve installing two one-way streets, one eastbound and one westbound. The streets should be located in close proximity to each other. The westbound street could be accommodated on Pine Avenue, one block north of Holly Avenue. This street could be re-striped as one-way westbound with angled parking on one side of the street. Pine Avenue is a narrow street and currently accommodates two-way traffic with parking on only the north side of the street due to the narrow street width. A one-way westbound street from Main Street to Standard Street would complete the one-way couplet. Angled parking could still only be accommodated on one only side of the street due to its narrowness, and approximately 4 extra on-street parking spaces could be provided. The conversion to one-way streets would require traffic signal modifications at the Holly Avenue and Main Street intersection, signage and pavement marking modifications at the Pine Avenue and Main Street stop sign and re-stripping and signage for both streets. No curb or sidewalk modifications are anticipated or budgeted. The City’s traffic engineer states in the Parking Demand Management section of the Specific Plan that currently there is adequate parking in the Downtown, and the potential construction of one-way streets is seen as a mid-term parking solution. A one-way street configuration would only need to be constructed when there is a demand for additional parking spaces, such as when there is construction of new square footage and/or a change in the mix of land uses in the area which increases the parking demand. As discussed above, in-lieu fees could be used to finance these improvements.

    Estimated Cost: $16,500

    Potential Funding Sources: General Fund, Gas Tax, Prop C (with MTA approval), in-lieu fees, BID, Parking District, and/or other assessment district

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